summer lunch: gazpacho, fried salmon and cabbage salad

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Lunch / Salads
salmon, cabbage and a glass of gazpacho

Here’s how to make the gazpacho. For the salad take a pointed cabbage (much softer than its big round brother), slice it finely and knead it a few times with your hands to crush the structure. Finally toss in the following dressing:

dressing for the cabbage salad

salt and freshly ground black pepper
vinegar
a generous amount of heated olive oil

Start seasoning the raw sliced cabbage with salt and pepper, add the vinegar and finally pour over the hot olive oil. Toss it well and let it rest for a while.

 

tomato bountyViksummer dress on a bike

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tiger nut milk (horchata de chufa)

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Drinks
horchata de chufa (tiger nut milk)

Tiger nuts -also known as earth almonds- aren’t really nuts. They are tubers growing under the soil’s surface. Tiger nuts are loaded with vitamins and minerals, especially with vitamin C and E. Besides this, they are rich in magnesium, potassium, calcium and phosphorus.

Tiger nut milk is already creamy and sweet without any supplements.  I usually add vanilla, sometimes cardamom or cinnamon, when I want to give it a special  flavour. For more sweetness you may add a spoonful of honey or maple syrup.
The original Spanish horchata de chufa is sweetened with sugar and contains a pinch of salt.

tiger nut milk (horchata de chufa)

200g tiger nuts, soaked in water overnight (at least 8 hours)
1l cold water
vanilla, cinnamon or cardamom to your liking 

Drain the tiger nuts from the soaking water and rinse thoroughly. Put the tiger nuts into a high speed blender with 1l of water and add your sweetener and condiments of choice. After blending pour the milk through a nut milk bag and squeeze it into a jug or bowl.

Pour the milk into a bottle. You can keep it in the fridge up to 4-5 days.

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picnic with sardines and quick pickled shallots

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Jams + Preserves / Lunch
picnic

The simplest things, like a tin of sardines, can be the most delicious when paired with a crispy baguette, quick pickled shallots and a bottle of champagne. Add a lemon to squeeze over the sardines and some fresh herbs to spread on top. Enjoy!

 
in the kitchensardines millesimerose "Mozart"quick pickled shallots

quick pickled shallots  

3-5 shallots, sliced
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
pinch of salt 

Slice the shallots and put them into a jam jar. Douse with the vinegar, add sugar and salt. Cover with the lid and give it a shake.

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matcha and strawberry tart

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Cakes + Cookies
matcha and strawberry tart

Another tart of Eric Kayser’s book Tartes et Gourmandises. It truly never fails! Any red berries work for this recipe; if you choose groseilles or red currants as in the original recipe I suggest you increase the amount of sugar to the original 300g. 

Tarte au Thé Vert Matcha et aux Fraises

300g butter
10 egg whites
200g icing sugar
130g finely grated almonds
130g flour
2 teaspoons matcha powder and some more for sprinkling on top
strawberries for topping
2 tablespoons strawberry (raspberry, gooseberry) jam or jelly 

Preheat oven to 170°C. 

Melt the butter in a saucepan until it turns golden brown.
In a bowl beat the egg whites with the sugar. Add the flour, the finely grated almonds and the matcha powder. Finally mix in the warm butter.

Pour the batter into the mold and bake it for 30 minutes. Let it cool down.

Liquify the berry jam or jelly in a saucepan on low heat. Add the strawberries and move them gently until evenly coated. Arrange them on the tart bottom. Before serving sprinkle with some more matcha powder.

summer garden matcha strawberry tart and Saxonian Eierscheckestrawberry and matcha tartsummer gardenstrawberry and matcha tart

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green rice and egg bowl

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Dinner / Lunch
bear garlic

For my spring pesto I use bear’s garlic (Bärlauch), sorrel or even ground elder (Giersch) from the garden.  Be careful in case you go foraging for bear’s garlic, the long and slender leaves can easily be mistaken by leaves of lily of the valley, which are super toxic.

green pesto

1 big handful (or a bunch if you buy it) bear’s garlic, sorrel or ground elder
20 g pine nuts
parmesan
40ml olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Chop the greens and the parmesan, combine all ingredients, mix, stir or blend them. Add salt and pepper to your liking. If you want the pesto more creamy add more olive oil or a small amount of tepid water. The good thing about pesto is that it’s easy to make adjustments as you go. 

basmati rice
serves 2

1/2 a cup rice + the double amount of water , cook 20 minutes on low heat
When finished, combine the rice with enough spoonfuls of pesto to tint it green.

topping

poached eggs
Equally delicious are chopped radishes, avocados, crumbles of goat cheese (feta) , cress and sprouts.

 

sorrel pestosorrel pestoegg to be poachedpear "Conference" in blossomspringgreen rice bowl

 Totally spring!  

 

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plum somen with lemon scented olive oil and black sesame

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Lunch / Snacks
pink noodles

Somen are very thin Japanese noodles made of wheat flour.  In the making process the dough is stretched to a max with the help of vegetable oil to achieve very thin strips. That’s the reason why you need to rinse them under cold water after cooking. Otherwise they would become sticky. The pink beauties I bought at Muji owe their colour and their slightly fruity/salty flavour to Ume, a Japanese plum.
 
Usually I eat somen with a dip of tamari, squeezed lemon, grated ginger and finely sliced scallions.This time I decided to simply pour some lemon scented olive oil on top and sprinkle them with  black sesame seeds.  A well balanced, slightly fruity – and oh, so beautiful -combination!

black sesameplum somenpink somenspoon and chopsticks pink noodles (3 von 4)plum some with lemon scented olive oil and black sesamepink noodles

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Grandma’s Classics: beef roulades (Rouladen)

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Dinner / Lunch
roulades

A German surprise package traditionally filled with pieces of dill pickle, mustard and thinly sliced bacon. The tart flavour of mustard  and dill pickle is a must, but to complete the filling I prefer thinly sliced vegetables like carrots, onions and bell pepper to bacon. 

 
beef roulades.beef roulades

Beef Roulades

for the roulades:
6 pieces of boneless beef round (pounded)
6 teaspoons Dijon mustard
6 dill pickles (sliced lengthwise)
1 big white onion (cut in thin wedges)
1 red bell pepper (cut in thin strips)
2 carrots (sliced lengthwise)
salt and freshly ground black pepper

for the sauce:
3 tablespoons olive oil (or 1 tablespoon olive oil, 2 tablespoons butter)
1 carrot 
2 small onions with the skin on (halved)
3 cloves of garlic
1 stick celery , preferably with the green
1 leek
1 tablespoon Hungarian paprika powder
2 glasses of red wine
3 cups of vegetable broth
salt and pepper to taste

Place slices of beef on a work surface and season both sides with salt and pepper. Spread one side with mustard. Arrange evenly vegetable and pickle slices on each slice of beef. Roll up the roulade and secure with kitchen twine.
Heat the oil in a casserole and sear the beef roulades on all sides – they should be brown but not too dark. Remove the roulades. Add the onions, garlic, carrots, leek and celery to the casserole and cook stirring constantly. Return the roulades to the casserole and add the red wine, the vegetable broth and the paprika powder. Bring to a simmer.  Cover and cook for about two hours on low heat.

Best with Knödl and red cabbage !

roulades

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